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Fat can also accumulate in the lungs

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Already in the past, several studies have linked being overweight or obesity to respiratory problems such as asthma or wheezing and something very close to confirming this connection came from a new study published in the European Respiratory Journal.

The researchers examined lung tissue samples taken from 52 cadavers stored in a respiratory tissue biobank. Of the 52 people to whom the corpses belonged, 16 had died from asthma. By analyzing the structure of the lungs, the researchers quantified the adipose tissue also comparing it with the body mass index of each person when he was alive.

The researchers say they have identified, for the first time, that adipose tissue can also accumulate in the airway walls of the lungs. The researchers suggest that this increase in fat may alter the normal functioning of the lung’s airways leading to inflammation of the latter and favoring diseases such as asthma. John Elliot, one of the authors of the study and a researcher at the Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, says: “By observing lung samples, we identified adipose tissue that had accumulated in the airway walls. We wanted to see if this accumulation was related to body weight.”

According to the other main research author, Peter Noble, an associate professor at the University of Western Australia in Perth, being overweight or being obese in the past had been linked to an increased risk of asthma but this connection had never been fully explained. This research shows that excess fat can also occur in the lungs, especially in the airway walls.

These can, in fact, be different in thickness and this can limit the flow of air both in and out, which in turn increases the risk of asthma. This would also explain why those who are overweight or obese tend to need to breathe more when doing physical activity, which increases the ventilatory load. Now the researchers want to find out if with a slimming effect it is possible not only to lower body weight but also to counteract these respiratory diseases.

Johnathan Flint

Johnathan is a recent graduate of the Missouri University of Science and Technology with a Bachelor of Medicine, and is an avid reader of numerous medical journals. He recently joined Health Shiner as an editor, researcher and content contributor, and brings a great deal of knowledge and wisdom to our reporting.

2462 White Oak Drive, Weston Missouri, 64098
Ph: 816-640-5682
Email: [email protected]
Johnathan Flint
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Medical Research

Dangerous cigarette compounds “travel” in every environment clinging to smokers’ clothes

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A further study focuses on so-called “third-hand smoke”, i.e. that type of second-hand smoke in which the injured party is in an environment, usually closed, where someone has smoked. The most striking example may be the interior of a car in which someone has smoked and there are still cigarette butts and ashes in the ashtrays.

This new study confirms that the remains of smoked cigarettes can cling to the bodies or clothes of smokers and then be released into non-smoking environments.
The team of researchers, led by Drew Gentner of Yale, shows in this study that these cigarette compounds can literally travel, and even in abundant quantities, in indoor environments frequented by non-smokers transported by smokers themselves.

According to the researchers, a person, even if he or she is in a room where no one has smoked, can still be exposed to many of the chemical compounds found in a cigarette if a person who had previously smoked has entered that room.
As Gentner explains, “People are substantial carriers of third-hand smoke contaminants in other rooms. Therefore, the idea that someone is protected from the potential health effects of cigarette smoke because they are not directly exposed to second-hand smoke is not right”.

To reach these conclusions, the researchers analysed the traces of cigarette compounds in a movie theatre. The researchers found that the amounts of these substances left by smokers, for example through their clothes on armchairs or in the air, increased dramatically after the screening of R-rated films, i.e. films for adults who naturally saw more smokers in the cinema.

The quantities of these dangerous substances, of which nicotine was the largest representative, were not even to be overlooked, according to the researchers: they were comparable to those of exposure to second-hand smoke.
These compounds continue to make their way into enclosed spaces despite strong bans and numerous regulations in many states around the world prohibiting people from smoking not only inside public places but also near entrances or near air vents.

Johnathan Flint

Johnathan is a recent graduate of the Missouri University of Science and Technology with a Bachelor of Medicine, and is an avid reader of numerous medical journals. He recently joined Health Shiner as an editor, researcher and content contributor, and brings a great deal of knowledge and wisdom to our reporting.

2462 White Oak Drive, Weston Missouri, 64098
Ph: 816-640-5682
Email: [email protected]
Johnathan Flint
Continue Reading

Medical Research

Tobacco also linked to worse mental health according to a new study

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Often, when reference is made to the damage of cigarette smoking, mental health is hardly ever thought about, and yet cigarettes are also bad for you. This is suggested by a study by Professor Hagai Levine of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem published in PLOS ONE.

Levine and colleagues carried out a survey of 2000 Serbian university students from different social and economic backgrounds. The researchers found that students who smoked showed higher rates of clinical depression than their non-smoking peers, two to three times.

Taking into consideration only the students of the University of Pristina, the researchers found that 14% of the smoking students suffered from depression compared to 4% of the non-smoking peers, while for the University of Belgrade the percentages were 19% compared to 11% respectively.

The same students who smoked also showed lower mental health scores than non-smokers. According to Levine, this study adds further evidence that smoking and depression may be linked; although there is no direct evidence yet that smoking causes depression, it can be said that tobacco seems to have a non-positive effect on mental health.

Johnathan Flint

Johnathan is a recent graduate of the Missouri University of Science and Technology with a Bachelor of Medicine, and is an avid reader of numerous medical journals. He recently joined Health Shiner as an editor, researcher and content contributor, and brings a great deal of knowledge and wisdom to our reporting.

2462 White Oak Drive, Weston Missouri, 64098
Ph: 816-640-5682
Email: [email protected]
Johnathan Flint
Continue Reading

Medical Research

One can evaluate hearing quality by analyzing pupil dilation according to researchers

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It may prove to be a new and effective hearing test developed by a team of neuroscientists at the University of Oregon. According to a statement on the university’s website, it is possible to assess a person’s hearing level by measuring pupil dilation.

According to the same statement, this approach could be useful to understand the quality of hearing in infants, young adults with disabilities and adults with stroke or other diseases and in general in those people for whom direct responses are not possible. The researchers performed experiments on 31 adults by monitoring the size of their pupils with eye detection technology. The detection took place while the same people performed a hearing test and while staring at an object at a monitor.

The study, published in the Journal of the Association for Research in Otorhinolaryngology, explains that this system is inspired by a discovery made by the main author of the study, Avinash Singh Bala, 10 years ago when he noticed changes in the pupils of barn owls in response to unexpected noises in their natural environment.

“What we discovered was that pupil dilation was as sensitive as the button-press method,” Bala explains. “We had presented the first data analyses at the conferences and there was a lot of resistance to the idea that by using an involuntary response we could get results as good as the button-pressing data.”

Johnathan Flint

Johnathan is a recent graduate of the Missouri University of Science and Technology with a Bachelor of Medicine, and is an avid reader of numerous medical journals. He recently joined Health Shiner as an editor, researcher and content contributor, and brings a great deal of knowledge and wisdom to our reporting.

2462 White Oak Drive, Weston Missouri, 64098
Ph: 816-640-5682
Email: [email protected]
Johnathan Flint
Continue Reading
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